indian cinema heritage foundation

Vardaan (1974)

  • LanguageHindi
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Banvarilal Sharma of village Sitapur was a God's good man, unselfish, humanitarian and philanthropist, whose all the hopes dinged to his sincere, honest and hardworking younger son on whose education he had spent whatever he had.

After graduating in engineering when Mahesh comes to Bombay in search of service he comes across a true friend, philosopher and guide in Nandlal Purohit the owner of Indra Bhuwan Guest House, who is rough and tough outside but an ocean of kindness within. Having no kith or kin in the world, golden-hearted Nandlal is immediately attached to Mahesh and as a loving elder brother falls out to do anything for Mahesh. 

Like the momentary bubbles of water Banvarilal's hopes crash down when Mahesh on getting service remits only Rs. 50/- once and Rs. 75/- next time. Increasing home expenses, heavy debts, raging monsoon, leaking roof and such a trifling sum no better than a couple of effect less drops on torrid hot iron bar. And Banvarilal has absolutely no hopes from his other good-for-nothing elder son Sunder, who on charge of raping an innocent belle, was beaten and kicked out of village from amidst a gathering where his younger brother Mahesh was being honoured on his triumph in higher studies.

 It was a most unexpected surprising shower of fortune when only after a few days Banvarilal got an M.O. of three thousand rupees from Sunder And then, one fine morning when Sunder drove into the village in his shining bright limousine and carried away his parents and younger sister Kusum to Bombay, the villagers were dumbfounded at the miracle of a 'bad' boy overnight turning into a boon “vardaare!
 
Luxuriously furnished posh bungalow of Sunder and his big name and fame on one side in contrast of stinking poor guest house of Mahesh and his low-salaried service on the other side, shattered the strong pillars of Banvarilal's high hopes and faith in honesty. 

In the underworld of smugglers Sunder was enjoying the repute of a big shot. Spending extravagantly he lays open all sorts of luxuries to his father to show himself at the top, and his younger brother rotting at the foot. Within no time the venom of the evil wealth spreads deep into the veins of the God's good man Banvarilal. The hand which always held `mala' now was proudly holding wine glass. The feet that always led him to pious Ganges now ran rapidly towards the racecourse and the orgies! And not merely the father but even the sweet little sister Kusum too is quickly drifted away into the sexotic mad fashions. The only unaffected two are the mother and the young son Mahesh who stuck un-shook to their lofty ideals. Banvarilal's wit is washed off to such an extent that influenced by Sunder's false prestige he even smears Sunder's devilish sin on the angel face of Mahesh, infuriating agonising hatred against him from his sweetheart Lata who all the while fought with her father to get married to Mahesh but now helpless surrendered to his denial and reluctantly agrees even to wed Sunder despite her all the dislike. The smouldering development of the exciting drama of vice and virtue reaches to explosive height which is better worth witnessing on the screen.

(From the official press booklet)